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Focus On Recovery – Spokane Regional Opioid Task Force

What You Need to Know About Substance Use Disorder

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What are Opioids?

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What is Addiction?

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Opioids and your Brain

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Dependence vs Addiction

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Poly-substance Use

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Risk Factors

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Health Risks of Drug Use

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Treating Opioid Use Disorder

Opioid use disorder is 100 percent preventable, but it’s also 100 percent treatable. The first and most effective is medication assisted treatment (MAT) with buprenorphine and methadone. People can be on those medications and in recovery, with an added bonus of reducing death by 50 percent.

Preventing Opioid Use Disorder

Drug prevention includes decreasing ACEs (adverse childhood experiences), increasing resiliency factors, increasing access to mental health professionals, knowing how to talk about the dangers of drugs effectively, and locking up medications.

Pregnant Women

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Pregnancy can be a wonderful, yet stressful time for any expecting mother. Yet, for someone struggling with substance use disorder, it can be particularly stressful. But there is information, and programs, to help.

Families

Living with a recovering drug addict or alcoholic requires a lot of love and support. Substance abuse and recovery not only affect the addict, but family and friends as well. As a loved one, it is crucial that you get involved with the recovery process to prevent relapse. Recovery is a lifelong commitment that loved ones must be involved in. Loved ones also need to learn how to take care of themselves and deal with any personal issues they’ve developed as a result of their family member’s addiction.

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Opioid Dashboard

Opioid overdose deaths have increased dramatically over the last two decades, leading federal authorities to declare an epidemic. Though the opioid death rate in Spokane county has decreased since 2006, non-fatal opioid events continue to increase. Opioid overdose hospitalizations have increased 2.5-fold since 2004.  Opioids are highly addictive substances and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to widespread misuse. In the past 10 years, more than 500 people have died from opioid-related deaths in Spokane County–about 4 people per month.

Data Highlights

unintentional opioid related deaths in 2017 in Spokane County

patients with at least one opioid prescription in 2018 in Spokane County

opioid overdose hospitalizations in 2017 in Spokane County

Spokane Focused On…

Education

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